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Civil Rights

Series

Ignoring Innocence

The Wrongfully Convicted Forced Into Plea Deals

Walking While Black

Pedestrian Enforcement and Racial Profiling

Documenting Hate

Tracking Hate Crimes and Bias Incidents

Dispatches from Freedom Summer

Race Then and Now

Stories

What’s Your Experience With the Americans With Disabilities Act? We Want to Know.

We want to know how the law affects you, whether you’re a person with a disability, caretaker, business owner, architect or contractor.

In New York, Intolerance Has Become Routine

A Human Rights Commission report says almost 40 percent of Muslim, Jewish and Sikh residents of the city surveyed had experienced some kind of harassment.

How the Fight Against Affirmative Action at Harvard Could Threaten Rich Whites

If preferences for black and Hispanic applicants are abolished, expect a backlash against admissions boosts for children of alumni and donors.

Video: Separada de su madre en la frontera, una niña de seis años tiene que buscar su propio camino

Una mujer salvadoreña se convierte en la cuerda salvavidas de su familia cuando su hermana fue llevada a un centro de detención en Texas y su sobrina a un albergue en Arizona.

Para una niña de seis años atrapada en el laberinto de inmigración, un número de teléfono memorizado se convierte en su salvavidas

Mientras el gobierno federal intenta reunir a las familias de migrantes, los niños tendrán la dura tarea de ayudar a identificar y ubicar a sus padres. La niña de seis años a quien se escuchaba en una grabación la semana pasada como pedía llamar a su tía tiene una ventaja.

How Voting Laws Have Changed Since 2016

See the new legislation and legal cases in your state that have the potential to change how you vote this November.

DeVos Has Scuttled More Than 1,200 Civil Rights Probes Inherited From Obama

Our data analysis shows that the Trump administration is less likely than its predecessor to find wrongdoing by school districts on issues ranging from racial and sexual harassment to meeting educational needs of disabled students.

Has Your School Been Investigated for Civil Rights Violations?

For the first time ever, ProPublica is making available the status of all of the civil rights cases that have been resolved during the past three years, as well as pending investigations. See if your school district or college is being investigated for civil rights violations and why.

Have You Experienced or Witnessed Civil Rights Violations at a School? Share Your Story.

Do you know something about a civil rights investigation at a school? Have you experienced or witnessed civil rights violations? We want to hear from you.

The Administration of Mayor Rahm Emanuel Keeps Monitoring Protesters

Chicago police and City Hall tracked anti-Trump demonstrators — and now state legislators want to let them use drones.

New Allegations Added to Lawsuit on How Facebook’s Targeting Tools Helped Advertisers Exclude Older Workers

A federal suit filed in December claimed older workers missed out on job opportunities because ads on Facebook targeted younger users. Now plaintiffs say Facebook’s tools and algorithm gave employers ways to intensify the effects of such targeting.

Federal Watchdog Launches Investigation of Age Bias at IBM

After a ProPublica story spotlighting IBM’s practices in shedding older workers, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission consolidated age discrimination complaints against the company from around the country.

Police Are Mislabeling Anti-LGBTQ and Other Crimes as Anti-Heterosexual

ProPublica sent public-records requests to more than 50 police departments that reported anti-heterosexual hate crimes to the FBI. None of the reports we could track down actually included evidence of hate crimes against straight people.

At a Killer’s Sentencing, Native Americans Talk of Both Healing and Enduring Suspicions

A white man in Washington state got 7 1/2 years for a killing some said was fueled by hate.

Were Henry’s Civil Rights Violated?

A Department of Homeland Security watchdog is looking into the case of a Long Island high school student who informed on the gang MS-13 and was marked for deportation.

A Killing at Donkey Creek

Jimmy Smith-Kramer, a basketball legend on the Quinault Nation reservation, was 20 when he was mowed down by a white man in a pickup truck. The decision not to charge a hate crime, and recent talk of a plea deal, has re-opened ancient wounds.

Shutdown of Texas Schools Probe Shows Trump Administration Pullback on Civil Rights

The U.S. Department of Education was investigating why black students in Bryan, Texas, are almost four times as likely as white students to be suspended. Then Betsy DeVos took over.

Jacksonville Sheriff Uses Misleading Data to Defend Pedestrian Ticketing

Sheriff Mike Williams has sought to counter the findings of racial disparities in pedestrian ticketing with his own set of numbers. They don’t add up.

NAACP Legal Defense Fund in Jacksonville Over Pedestrian Ticket Enforcement

Reporting by The Florida Times-Union and ProPublica prompts the Legal Defense Fund to start on-the-ground interviews.

Jacksonville Sheriff Admits Race May Have Played a Role in Ticket Writing

The sheriff says blacks were not targeted for pedestrian tickets but “implicit bias” might have factored into enforcement by officers.

Congressman’s Bill Would Force Trump Administration to Fulfill Pledge to Study Racial Disparities in Auto Insurance Pricing

Rep. Mark Takano, D-Calif., cited our report that minority neighborhoods pay higher car insurance premiums than white areas with the same risk.

Jacksonville City Council President and Local Public Defender Call for Suspension of Pedestrian Ticket Writing

A legal bulletin by the Jacksonville state attorney supports the finding that sheriff’s officers have been issuing hundreds of tickets in error, a disproportionate number of them to blacks.

Trump Justice Department Pushes for Citizenship Question on Census, Alarming Experts

“This is a recipe for sabotaging the census,” said one. The administration’s stated reason for the controversial move: protecting civil rights.

Reporting Recipe: Investigating Your Police Department’s Handling of Hate Crime Reports

We found inconsistencies in how local law enforcement agencies across the country report hate crimes to the federal government. Here’s how you can use the data to report local stories.

What We Discovered During a Year of Documenting Hate

Hate crimes often fall through the cracks in our justice system, and we've only just scratched the surface of understanding why.

Florida Police Issue Hundreds of Bad Pedestrian Tickets Every Year Because They Don’t Seem to Know the Law

The tickets for failing to cross in a crosswalk don’t just carry fines; they can damage credit rating and lead to the suspensions of driver’s licenses. A Florida Times-Union/ProPublica examination shows lots of them never should have been issued.

Pedestrian Tickets Lead to Hundreds of Suspended Driver’s Licenses

In Jacksonville, not paying your jaywalking ticket can cost you the ability to get to school or work. Again, blacks bear a disproportionate impact.

Local Lawmakers and Civil Rights Groups Call for Suspending Pedestrian Tickets in Jacksonville

Concerns about targeted enforcement against African Americans come after a Florida Times-Union/ProPublica investigation.

Why America Fails at Gathering Hate Crime Statistics

The FBI relies on local law enforcement agencies to identify and report crimes motivated by bias, but many agencies fumble this task.

A Dubious Arrest, a Compromised Prosecutor, a Tainted Plea: How One Murder Case Exposes a Broken System

One innocent man’s odyssey through the justice system shows the cascading, and enduring, effects of a bad conviction.

Facebook to Temporarily Block Advertisers From Excluding Audiences by Race

The social network’s actions come after a ProPublica investigation revealed that Facebook failed to keep its promise to reject discriminatory housing ads.

Facebook (Still) Letting Housing Advertisers Exclude Users by Race

After ProPublica revealed last year that Facebook advertisers could target housing ads to whites only, the company announced it had built a system to spot and reject discriminatory ads. We retested and found major omissions.

This Is Where Hate Crimes Don’t Get Reported

FBI statistics on hate crimes remain frustratingly inadequate. Here are some of the jurisdictions where low or nonexistent reporting leave us with known unknowns.

One Officer, Scores of Tickets and a Familiar Racial Disparity

C.J. Brown wrote four times as many pedestrian tickets as any other officer in Jacksonville over the last five years. Most of them went to blacks. His boss says he’s just “good at his job.”

Walking While Black

Jacksonville’s enforcement of pedestrian violations raises concerns that it’s another example of racial profiling.

The Ticketed Feel Targeted

A truck driver, a mother, a lawyer and a number of young men offer their accounts of walking while black.

Here Are the Hate Incidents Against Mosques and Islamic Centers Since 2013

Data from a civil rights group shows that reports of hate incidents involving American mosques jumped sharply in 2015 and has remained at the same rate since — about once every three days.

A Stealth History Lesson in Baltimore

The city’s removal of Confederate statues in the dead of night was Baltimore’s latest attempt to make peace with the ghosts of the Civil War.

‘The 100th Nail in the Coffin’ for Integration in Westchester County

The Trump administration ended a yearslong battle over fair housing, but the promise to end segregation was broken long before that.

Has the Moment for Environmental Justice Been Lost?

Facing Trump’s proposals for cutting programs that help minorities and the poor, Democrats scramble to make up for missed opportunities to protect them.

A Wisconsin Republican Looks Back With Regret at Voter ID and Redistricting Fights

Republican efforts to impose voter ID laws and redraw election districts both wound up in federal court. Dale Schultz ended 30 years in state politics lamenting the recent displays of partisanship.

Victims in Thousands of Potential Hate Crimes Never Notify Police

A new federal survey on hate crimes offers cause for both alarm and confusion.

Facebook’s Secret Censorship Rules Protect White Men From Hate Speech But Not Black Children

A trove of internal documents sheds light on the algorithms that Facebook’s censors use to differentiate between hate speech and legitimate political expression.

Supreme Court Won’t Take Up R.J. Reynolds Age Discrimination Case

The decision in a case involving the nation’s second-largest tobacco company gives employers new ways to shield themselves from charges of bias against older applicants.

Trump Administration Quietly Rolls Back Civil Rights Efforts Across Federal Government

Previously unannounced directives will limit the Department of Justice’s use of a storied civil rights enforcement tool, and loosen the Department of Education’s requirements on investigations.

The Trump Administration Lost Again in Court, This Time on Voter ID

A federal judge ruled that Texas’ voter ID was intended to discriminate against blacks and Latinos. The Department of Justice tried to argue otherwise.

Photos: Baltimore in the Wake of Freddie Gray

In the tumult following Freddie Gray’s death, a young photographer documented life in a city under siege.

School Segregation, the Continuing Tragedy of Ferguson

Michael Brown beat the odds by graduating from high school before his death — odds that remain stacked against black students in St. Louis and the rest of the country.

Keep on Pushing

Fifty years after Freedom Summer, two Mississippi sisters press the fight for voting rights.

Interview With Civil Rights Legend John Lewis: Audio

Listen to Nikole Hannah-Jones interview barrier-breaking Freedom Rider and longtime congressman John Lewis.

Long a Force for Progress, a Freedom Summer Legend Looks Back

Georgia Congressman John Lewis talks about what changed — and didn’t — because of the movement he helped to lead 50 years ago.

When Freedom Summer Landed in White America’s Living Rooms

An iconic civil rights print hung in one rural Maine home and helped shape a family’s commitment to justice.

A Brutal Loss, but an Enduring Conviction

Rita Bender, 22 when her husband Michael Schwerner was killed by the Klan in Mississippi in 1964, says challenges remain in the fight for racial justice.

Ghosts of Greenwood

A reporter goes to Mississippi and encounters the echoes of family and the struggle for civil rights.

Dispatches From Freedom Summer

A variety of voices revisit the events and lessons of Mississippi’s long hot summer of 1964.

No

Sixty years after the Supreme Court declared an end to “separate but equal” education, many Southern school districts have moved back in time, isolating poor black and Latino students in segregated schools. ProPublica investigates Tuscaloosa’s city schools, which are among the most rapidly resegregating in the country.

Share Your Six Words on Race and Education in America

Sixty years after the Supreme Court declared an end to “separate but equal” education, many Southern school districts have moved back in time, isolating poor black and Latino students in segregated schools. ProPublica investigates Tuscaloosa’s city schools, which are among the most rapidly resegregating in the country.

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