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Documenting Hate

Tracking Hate Crimes and Bias Incidents

Dispatches from Freedom Summer

Race Then and Now

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Here Are the Hate Incidents Against Mosques and Islamic Centers Since 2013

Data from a civil rights group shows that reports of hate incidents involving American mosques jumped sharply in 2015 and has remained at the same rate since — about once every three days.

A Stealth History Lesson in Baltimore

The city’s removal of Confederate statues in the dead of night was Baltimore’s latest attempt to make peace with the ghosts of the Civil War.

‘The 100th Nail in the Coffin’ for Integration in Westchester County

The Trump administration ended a yearslong battle over fair housing, but the promise to end segregation was broken long before that.

Has the Moment for Environmental Justice Been Lost?

Facing Trump’s proposals for cutting programs that help minorities and the poor, Democrats scramble to make up for missed opportunities to protect them.

A Wisconsin Republican Looks Back With Regret at Voter ID and Redistricting Fights

Republican efforts to impose voter ID laws and redraw election districts both wound up in federal court. Dale Schultz ended 30 years in state politics lamenting the recent displays of partisanship.

Victims in Thousands of Potential Hate Crimes Never Notify Police

A new federal survey on hate crimes offers cause for both alarm and confusion.

Facebook’s Secret Censorship Rules Protect White Men From Hate Speech But Not Black Children

A trove of internal documents sheds light on the algorithms that Facebook’s censors use to differentiate between hate speech and legitimate political expression.

Supreme Court Won’t Take Up R.J. Reynolds Age Discrimination Case

The decision in a case involving the nation’s second-largest tobacco company gives employers new ways to shield themselves from charges of bias against older applicants.

Trump Administration Quietly Rolls Back Civil Rights Efforts Across Federal Government

Previously unannounced directives will limit the Department of Justice’s use of a storied civil rights enforcement tool, and loosen the Department of Education’s requirements on investigations.

The Trump Administration Lost Again in Court, This Time on Voter ID

A federal judge ruled that Texas’ voter ID was intended to discriminate against blacks and Latinos. The Department of Justice tried to argue otherwise.

Photos: Baltimore in the Wake of Freddie Gray

In the tumult following Freddie Gray’s death, a young photographer documented life in a city under siege.

School Segregation, the Continuing Tragedy of Ferguson

Michael Brown beat the odds by graduating from high school before his death — odds that remain stacked against black students in St. Louis and the rest of the country.

Keep on Pushing

Fifty years after Freedom Summer, two Mississippi sisters press the fight for voting rights.

Interview With Civil Rights Legend John Lewis: Audio

Listen to Nikole Hannah-Jones interview barrier-breaking Freedom Rider and longtime congressman John Lewis.

Long a Force for Progress, a Freedom Summer Legend Looks Back

Georgia Congressman John Lewis talks about what changed — and didn’t — because of the movement he helped to lead 50 years ago.

When Freedom Summer Landed in White America’s Living Rooms

An iconic civil rights print hung in one rural Maine home and helped shape a family’s commitment to justice.

A Brutal Loss, but an Enduring Conviction

Rita Bender, 22 when her husband Michael Schwerner was killed by the Klan in Mississippi in 1964, says challenges remain in the fight for racial justice.

Ghosts of Greenwood

A reporter goes to Mississippi and encounters the echoes of family and the struggle for civil rights.

Dispatches From Freedom Summer

A variety of voices revisit the events and lessons of Mississippi’s long hot summer of 1964.

No

Sixty years after the Supreme Court declared an end to “separate but equal” education, many Southern school districts have moved back in time, isolating poor black and Latino students in segregated schools. ProPublica investigates Tuscaloosa’s city schools, which are among the most rapidly resegregating in the country.

Share Your Six Words on Race and Education in America

Sixty years after the Supreme Court declared an end to “separate but equal” education, many Southern school districts have moved back in time, isolating poor black and Latino students in segregated schools. ProPublica investigates Tuscaloosa’s city schools, which are among the most rapidly resegregating in the country.

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