ProPublica

Journalism in the Public Interest

Jesse Eisinger

Jesse Eisinger
Read Jesse Eisinger's e-book, The Wall Street Money Machine, on your Kindle or mobile device.

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Jesse Eisinger is a senior reporter at ProPublica.

In April 2011, he and a colleague won the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for a series of stories on questionable Wall Street practices that helped make the financial crisis the worst since the Great Depression. He won the 2015 Gerald Loeb Award for commentary. He has also twice been a finalist for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting.

He was a regular columnist for The New York Times’s Dealbook section. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, The NewYorker.com, The Washington Post, The Baffler, The American Prospect and on NPR and "This American Life." Before joining ProPublica, he was the Wall Street Editor of Conde Nast Portfolio and a columnist for the Wall Street Journal, covering markets and finance.

He lives in Brooklyn with his wife, the journalist Sarah Ellison, and their daughters.

Articles

Trump’s Treasury Secretary Pick is a Lucky Man. Very Lucky.

Steven Mnuchin has a long history of coming out ahead, even in questionable deals.

Surprise: Trump’s Adviser on Wall Street Regulations is a Longtime Swamp-Dweller

Trump’s transition adviser for financial regulations works for a firm that is emblematic of the Washington revolving door.

These Professors Make More Than a Thousand Bucks an Hour Peddling Mega-Mergers

The economists are leveraging their academic prestige with secret reports justifying corporate concentration. Their predictions are often wrong and consumers pay the price.

While in the White House, Economist Received Personal Loans From Top Washington Lawyer

Gene Sperling received hundreds of thousands of dollars in personal loans from Howard Shapiro, a friend and partner at Washington law firm WilmerHale while serving as director of the National Economic Council.

U.S. Attorney Asks Court to Reconsider Countrywide Loan Case

Prosecutors are challenging an appeals court ruling that said the lending company could not be charged with fraud as long as its initial intentions were pure.

Bank of America’s Winning Excuse: We Didn’t Mean To

A federal appeals court overturned a $1.3 billion judgement against Bank of America, ruling that good intentions at the outset shield bankers from fines for subsequent fraud.

Why Haven’t Bankers Been Punished? Just Read These Insider SEC Emails

Right after the financial crisis, an SEC lawyer fought a lonely struggle to get his agency to crackdown harder on Goldman bankers. He lost.

How Mark Zuckerberg’s Altruism Helps Himself

Zuckerberg set up a limited liability company, which has reaped enormous benefits as public relations coup and will help minimize his tax bill.

The Whistleblower’s Tale: How An Accountant Took on Halliburton

In 2005, Tony Menendez blew the whistle on Halliburton’s accounting practices. The fight cost him nine years of his life.

No, the Banks Aren’t Losing

Red Cross Demands Corrections to Our ‘Misleading’ Coverage. Here’s Our Response

The Red Cross' response comes months after our initial coverage, which we stand by.

The Trouble With Disclosure: It Doesn’t Work

Rent to Own: Wall Street’s Latest Housing Trick

Obama Stands At Crossroads On Financial Reform

Senator Demands Answers on Red Cross’ Finances

Prompted by an investigation by ProPublica and NPR, Sen. Charles Grassley asks the charity to explain how it has used donations from the public.

How Fear Of Occupy Wall Street Undermined the Red Cross’ Sandy Relief Effort

Red Cross responders say there was a ban on working with the widely praised Occupy Sandy relief group because it was seen as politically unpalatable.

The Wall Street Takeover of Charity

Red Cross’ Latest Claim Includes ‘Donations of Blood’

The charity is now resting its claim of 91 cents of donations going to services on the idea that donations include not just money but also "donations of blood."

The Red Cross CEO Has Been Serially Misleading About Where Donors’ Dollars Are Going

The charity and its chief executive, Gail McGovern, have long said 91 cents of every dollar donated goes to aiding those in need. Except it’s not true.

Now What? Failed Allergan Deal Strains Valeant

Jesse Eisinger
Read Jesse Eisinger's e-book, The Wall Street Money Machine, on your Kindle or mobile device.

Contact Info

Get Updates

Our Hottest Stories

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