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Have You Ever Been Sued Over a Debt? Help ProPublica Investigate Collection Practices

Have You Ever Been Sued Over a Debt? Help ProPublica Investigate Collection Practices

We’re reporting on how consumers are affected by the confusing new system of debt collection. Do you have a story to share?

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Have You Ever Been Sued Over a Debt? Help ProPublica Investigate Collection Practices .

Have You Ever Been Sued Over a Debt? Help ProPublica Investigate Collection Practices

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Pop Quiz: Can You Name That NSA Program? .

Pop Quiz: Can You Name That NSA Program?

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Transcript: Should Public Schools be Free to Pin Down Students? .

Transcript: Should Public Schools be Free to Pin Down Students?

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Journalists: How to Report on Restraints in U.S. Schools .

Journalists: How to Report on Restraints in U.S. Schools

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Do You Know a Child Who’s Been Forcibly Restrained at School? .

Do You Know a Child Who’s Been Forcibly Restrained at School?

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Discussion: How To Protect Your Privacy Online .

Discussion: How To Protect Your Privacy Online

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Discussion: School Resegregation 60 Years After Brown v. Board .

Discussion: School Resegregation 60 Years After Brown v. Board

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I taught at one school for special ed kids where restraining children and isolating them in a “timeout room” was done regularly even though it was clear that it wasn’t effective for at least two of the children in the classroom that I observed.

I taught in another school, same type of children, where restraining children was rare, positive reinforcement of desired behavior was the primary means used to control behavior, and the only “timeout room” was the administrator’s office.

The difference? Training and a competent administrator.

A teacher shared her experience in classrooms with special needs children who are often restrained, and what made the difference between a healthy and abusive environment. 

Our Heather Vogell recently reported on restraint and isolation of kids in public schools across the U.S. — an often violent practice that is legal in many states. 

Parents and teachers: what do you think?

If you would like to tell us something about how restraints and isolation works at your school, give us a tip and help us keep reporting this story. 

The above comment was lightly edited for readability.

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I speak as the father of an autistic child. I know that sometimes she requires gentle restraint or monitored seclusion. Categorizing all manner of seclusion or restraint as child abuse would make it more difficult for the educators and therapists who are trying to help and teach her.

One reader and father talked about why restraints are sometimes necessary for his autistic child. 

Our reporter Heather Vogell reported on how restraints are used on students in U.S. public schools, and our readers have been sharing their experiences with restraints. 

Parents and educators: is this an issue at your school? Share what you know about restraints.

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The real story is the governments ability to dominate, organize, and find patterns (signatures) in the vast amounts of data heretofore unprotected by the 4th [amendment]. Query: has that ability reached a critical mass that requires that we now give those discrete bits of info further protection?
ProPublica readerThe Best Stories on the Government’s Growing Surveillance Read More