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Ryan Gabrielson

Ryan Gabrielson

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Ryan Gabrielson is a reporter for ProPublica covering the U.S. justice system. In 2013, his stories for the Center for Investigative Reporting on violent crimes at California’s board-and-care institutions for the developmentally disabled were a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service.

Previously, he was a reporter at the East Valley Tribune in Mesa, Ariz. In 2009, he and Tribune colleague Paul Giblin won a Pulitzer Prize for stories that exposed how immigration enforcement by the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office undermined investigations and emergency response. Gabrielson's work has received numerous national honors, including two George Polk Awards, an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Silver Baton, the Al Nakkula Award for Police Reporting, and a Sigma Delta Chi Award. He was a 2009-2010 investigative reporting fellow at UC Berkeley.

A Phoenix native, Gabrielson studied journalism at the University of Arizona and now lives in Oakland with his wife and two daughters.

Articles

Prosecutors in Portland Change Policy on Drug Convictions

No guilty plea for drug possession will stand in Multnomah County unless the preliminary police field tests used to make arrests are confirmed in a lab.

Confusion Over Drug Tests Highlights Lack of Training for Florida Officers

A series of embarrassments suggests Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office could use some instruction on using and interpreting field tests that have resulted in thousands of drug arrests in recent years.

Defense Lawyers in Las Vegas Consider Formal Challenge to Use of Field Tests in Drug Prosecutions

Local defense bar explores options after ProPublica investigation showed that police and prosecutors continue to use flawed drug tests in sending thousands to jail.

Unreliable and Unchallenged

Years after the Las Vegas crime lab wanted to replace faulty police drug kits, they are still used in thousands of convictions.

Sustained Objections

For years, police and prosecutors have used special presentations to sell judges on the ​​​​​reliability of drug tests that help convict thousands.

‘No Field Test is Fail Safe’: Meet the Chemist Behind Houston’s Police Drug Kits

Decades after L.J. Scott developed a test for cocaine, his invention played a role in hundreds of wrongful convictions in Houston.

Busted

Tens of thousands of people every year are sent to jail based on the results of a $2 roadside drug test. Widespread evidence shows that these tests routinely produce false positives. Why are police departments and prosecutors still using them?

System Failures

Houston cases shed light on a disturbing possibility: that wrongful convictions are most often not isolated acts of misconduct by the authorities but systemic breakdowns — among judges and prosecutors, defense lawyers and crime labs.

Another Startling Verdict for Forensic Science

A recent study on the reliability of hair analysis is only latest to shake public confidence.

For Darren Sharper, a Place in Prison. But in Hall of Fame, Too?

The NFL’s Hall of Fame rules allow a serial rapist to be considered. Should that change?

Upon Further Review: Inside the Police Failure to Stop Darren Sharper’s Rape Spree

ProPublica and The New Orleans Advocate investigate how a former NFL star's rape spree could have been curtailed.

Answering the Critics of our Deadly Force Story

We respond to arguments levied against our analysis of justified homicides by police officers.

Deadly Force, in Black and White

A ProPublica analysis of killings by police shows outsize risk for young black males.

Woman Involved in Security Lapse at Arizona Terror Center Stripped of Citizenship

Immigration case leads to likely exile of Chinese immigrant who had role in embarrassing episode in Phoenix.

Intelligence Gap: How a Chinese National Gained Access to Arizona’s Terror Center

An un-vetted computer engineer plugged into law enforcement networks and a database of 5 million Arizona drivers in a possible breach that was kept secret for years.
Ryan Gabrielson

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